Tuesday, May 3, 2011

The Huntington Part II

After enjoying the succulent garden at the Huntington, we headed over to the children's garden. Definitely a departure from the typical brightly colored, veggie-based children's gardens that always seem to include a bean tepee and straw bales, the Huntington children's garden was edgier with a minimal color palate and high-end hardscape. One of the coolest structures was the nail and pebble music maker. By dropping small pebbles through a maze of nails set in concrete, kids could make a surprisingly lovely tinkly sound. Another favorite was the magnetic metal shavings. Kids could form the shavings into an arch and of course, smash it apart.

huntington nail musichuntington nailshuntington crow and applehuntington magnetic shavings

huntington magnetic toy

The plantings were simple and tough, but very lovely.

huntington childrens garden planting

huntington aloe seed podshuntington red grey plantingshuntington brachychiton sillinesshuntington grey black plantings

Other features included steam, mist and hiding places.

huntington volcanohuntington temple of mist

huntington moisture loving plantings

huntington kids tunnel

All in all, a really fun and cool looking children's garden. The only lame part was when twice I saw workers telling kids to quit splashing water from out of the water features. Kind of uptight for a children's garden, no?

We also had a great time exploring the plantings around the main lawn area. The unpruned cedars created such an amazing space.

huntington cedar

huntington under the cedars

And who can resist a giant grove of bamboo?

huntington bamboohuntington a picture isn't worth a thousand wordshuntington yellow bromiliadhuntington magenta

huntington yellow tree

huntington yellow tree flowers

huntington crotalaria agatifolia

There are a lot of neoclassical and romantic parts of the garden too.

huntington basinhuntington templehuntington rose arborhuntington statuary

huntington romantic garden

huntington plaster trees

The mansion is impressively luxurious - crisp, white and formal contrasting with its tropical setting.

huntington mansion garden

huntington the back porch

huntington tropical garden

huntington more bamboo lovehuntington so silveryhuntington ficushuntington ficus fruit

The Conservatory was quite an eyeful too. There were lots of educational exhibits that were engaging for kids and adults alike.

huntington wall fernhuntington vertical plantinghuntington cute little bamboohuntington future botanist

huntington tourquiosehuntington tourquoise beautieshuntington odd flowerhuntington escaped roots

huntington philodendron anchor rootshuntington that plant needs a fig leafhuntington brug look alikehuntington brug look alike close

I love this Polygonum(?). I wonder if it can grow outside here?

huntington polygonum

With so many excellent features, the Huntington definitely has something to thrill everyone. There were many parts of the I didn't get a chance to see, I'm definitely going to have to go back.


9 comments:

  1. How fun to visit with your little guy. HBC is so big that kids can really let some steam off in the big spaces -- but I guess splashing water is off limits!

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  2. Crazy amazing pics !!! your photographies are really gorgeous. I love the way you take pictures !! bravo , Floradora !

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  3. Oh my! One of your pics made me blush!!!! LOL! I totally need to check this place out though- looks like fun!

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  4. My favorite part of the kid's garden are the bronze crows, and that mister--on hot summer days that mister is heaven-sent.

    Your photos are gorgeous!

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  5. Wow! That garden is now officially on my list of must-do's. Hopefully next year I can visit it. I'm sure my kids will also have as much fun as your adorable boy.

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  6. I love the virtual tour -- beautiful images. Thanks for taking us there.

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  7. love the blue green Strongylodon vine!

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  8. wow, what great pictures thank for sharing, do you know what species bamboo is?

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